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1 TAYLOR Life and Times of James B. Taylor. By George B. Taylor. With an Intr
19TH-AM-PA-PHILA-BIBLE & PUBL SOC 
TAYLOR, GEORGE B. Life and Times of James B. Taylor. By George B. Taylor. With an Introduction by J. B. Jeter, D.D. Philadelphia: The Bible and Publication Society, No. 530 Arch Street. (c1872, Westcott & Thomson, Stereotypers and Electrotypers, Philada.) 12mo. Bound publisher's green cloth with gilt lettering on spine and publisher's embellished initials on front cover in gilt and rear cover in blind, cloth chipped & rubbed away at spine ends and corners, covers soiled--especially the spine, small red bordered 19th century shelf tag at bottom of spine, yellow endpapers, lacking front free endpaper, light foxing, pages tanning some. Engraved frontispiece of J.B. Taylor. Pagination: (1) title, (1) copyright, 3-6 introduction, 7-359, (1) blank. James Barnett Taylor (1804-1871) Baptist clergyman & administrator. He was longtime pastor in Richmond, Va. and for 26 years corresponding secretary of the Foreign Mission Board. "Through the Civil War and reconstruction period when the Southern Baptist Convention did not meet every year, Taylor kept the organization intact. By private and public appeals, he secured money for immediate and for future needs."--E.C. Routh in Ency. of Southern Baptists II:1347. 
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2 TAYLOR Social Problem. Seest Thou This Woman? A Discourse by Rev. A.A.E
19TH-AM-OH-CINCINNATI 
TAYLOR, A. A. E. The Social Problem. Seest Thou This Woman? A Discourse by Rev. A.A.E. Taylor, Mt. Auburn Presbyterian Church. Published by Request. Cincinnati: Robert Clarke & Co., No. 65 West Fourth Street. 1871. Octavo. Pamphlet bound in printed blue paper wrapper, wrapper chipped away along spine, chipped at all edges, vertical crease in pamphlet. 17pp. Archibald Alexander Edward Taylor (1834- ) Presbyterian minister, graduate of Princeton Theol. Seminary, licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Cincinnati in 1857, pastor in Portland, Ky., Dubuque, Iowa, Georgetown, D.C., and Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1873 he succeeded Willis Lord as President of the Synodical Univ. at Wooster, Ohio. We offer his sermon on Luke vii,44. "And He turned to the woman and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman?" 
Price: 20.00 USD
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3 TAYLOR Virginia Baptist Ministers. Sixth Series. 1914-1934 with Supplement

TAYLOR, GEORGE BRAXTON. Virginia Baptist Ministers. Sixth Series 1914-1935 with Supplement. With a Foreword by Rev. R. H. Pitt. Lynchburg, Va., J. P. Bell Co., 1935, 518pp (without suppl.), index, bright & very good condition. The Sixth Series contains biographies of 280 ministers who died between 1914-1934. 
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A Discourse Concerning Prayer Ex tempore, or, By pretence of the Spirit, In justification of Authorized and Set-formes of Lyturgie., TAYLOR, JEREMY.
4 TAYLOR, JEREMY. A Discourse Concerning Prayer Ex tempore, or, By pretence of the Spirit, In justification of Authorized and Set-formes of Lyturgie.
1646 good bound pamphlet Quarto, 14.7 x 16.8cm. 17TH-ENG 
Jeremy Taylor on "Ex tempore Prayer," 1646


TAYLOR, JEREMY. A Discourse Concerning Prayer Ex tempore, or, By pretence of the Spirit, In justification of Authorized and Set-formes of Lyturgie. I Cor. 14.32. [2 lines in Greek] And the spirits of the Prophets are subject to the Prophets. For God is not the author of confusion, but of peace, as in all Churches of the Saints. Printed in the Yeere, MDCXLVI [1646--note the roman numeral date is printed with turned c's] Quarto, 14.7 x 16.8cm. $225.00

Pamphlet bound full modern black leather with new endpapers, modern bookplate of M.S. Carothers on front paste-down endpaper, title creased and soiled with small tear in margin--partial vertical tear in crease repaired with archival paper as well as two small marginal tears, dampstain in inside & bottom margin of first few pages, light foxing. Book label of Graham Pollard on verso of title.

Collation: A-E4. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, 1-38pp. Variant with a comma after the word Spirit on line 6 of the title. Other variant has a period. Wing T312. Online ESTC cit. no. R201249 with 7 libraries in the U.K. and 6 in the U.S. including Folger Shakespeare.

Jeremy Taylor (1613-1667) Church of England bishop and writer. "He was a chaplin in the royalist army in 1642. After imprisonment for a short time, he retired to Wales in 1645 where he lived as chaplain to Lord Carbery at Golden Grove. Many of Taylor's best works were written here... Taylor's fame to-day rests almost entirely on his devotional writings..."--Cross: Oxford Dict. of the Christian Church, p.1325. Taylor's work on extempore prayer is a response to "this book which the Assembly of Divines is pleased to call The Directory for Prayer." He argues against the use of extempore prayer quoting among others scriptures such as Eccles. 5.2 "Be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thy heart be hasty to utter anything before God, for God is in heaven and thou upon earth, therefore let thy words be few."
(16432) 
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5 TAYLOR, JOHN. The Hebrew Concordance, Adapted to the English Bible; Disposed after The Manner of Buxtorf.
1754 Bound full calf with raised bands and red & black vol. 2 is lacking the title labels, all 4 covers are re-attached with new cords formed by linen thread sewn around old cords, not rebacked but thread dyed brown to match spine leather, leather split along all hinges, inside hinges strengthened with paper strips pasted over hinges, spine ends chipped, rubbed and scuffed, dark pink paint drip runs from near the outside edges of the rear cover--top to bottom--about 5mm wide but wider in a few places, worn through leather at corners, corners consolidated with book glue, covers rubbed & scuffed, faded red page edges, light damp stain on inside lower corner of last 30 leaves--triangular 16 x 1cm, light foxing--heavier on endpapers. large folio's London: Printed by J. Waugh and W. Fenner, at the Turk's Head in Lombard-Street; and sold by P. Vaillant, opposite Southampton-Street in the Strand. M.DCC.LIV. [1754] M.DCC.LVII. [1757]. 
John Taylor's Monumental Hebrew-English Concordance, First Edition, London, 1754-57

TAYLOR, JOHN. The Hebrew Concordance, Adapted to the English Bible; Disposed after The Manner of Buxtorf. In Two Volumes. By John Taylor of Norwich. Vol. I. [& II] [small woodcut device] London: Printed by J. Waugh and W. Fenner, at the Turk's Head in Lombard-Street; and sold by P. Vaillant, opposite Southampton-Street in the Strand. M.DCC.LIV. [1754] M.DCC.LVII. [1757]. Two volumes, large folio's.

Bound full calf with raised bands and red & black morocco title and volume labels but vol. 2 is lacking the title labels, all 4 covers are re-attached with new cords formed by linen thread sewn around old cords, not rebacked but thread dyed brown to match spine leather, leather split along all hinges, inside hinges strengthened with paper strips pasted over hinges, spine ends chipped, rubbed and scuffed, dark pink paint drip runs from near the outside edges of the rear cover--top to bottom--about 5mm wide but wider in a few places, worn through leather at corners, corners consolidated with book glue, covers rubbed & scuffed, faded red page edges, light damp stain on inside lower corner of last 30 leaves--triangular 16 x 1cm, light foxing--heavier on endpapers. Title printed in red and black. Engraved device used on title repeated at end of each Hebrew letter in the lexicon. LACKING THE PORTRAIT.

Collation: title leaf, dedication leaf, a4, b2, B-Z2, Aa-Zz2, Aaa-Zzz2, 4A-7Z2, 8A-8H2; title leaf, preface leaf, subscribers leaf, B-Z2, Aa-Zz2, Aaa-Ccc2, 4A-8Z, 9A2, 9B1 (lacking final blank).

There are two American signatures on the front free endpapers of each volume: "Nathan Strong's" and "Th. W. Coit, Cambridge, Mass." There is another signature that somebody when to considerable effort to removed from the same page. Nathan Strong 1748-1816. Congregational minister, graduate of Yale college, ordained 1773 and pastor of First Church, Hartford, CT, where he remained the rest of his life. He was the originator of the Connecticut Evangelical Magazine. Thomas Winthrop Coit 1803-1885, Episcopal clergyman and theologian. He graduated from Yale College in 1821, attended Andover Theological Seminary 1823-24 and Princeton Theological Seminary 1824-25, where his studies led him to withdraw from the Congregational Church and Join the Episcopalian. Hew was ordained a priest in 1827. He was variously rector of Christ Church, Cambridge; president of Transylvania Univ., Lexington, Ky.; rector Trinity Church, New Rochele, NY; prof. of Church History, Trinity College, Hartford, Ct.; lecturer and prof. of Church History in Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Ct. 1854-1885. "He was an able student of the Bible, of liturgics, and of church history, a zealous churchman, and the master of dignified, vigourous English. His theological library of 1400 volumes now belongs to the Berkeley Divinity School."--Dict. Natl. Biog. IV:278.

John Taylor (1694-1761) Unitarian theologian and Hebrew scholar. He studied at Whitehaven, a non-conformist academy for the Presbyterian & Congregational ministries. It was here that he began the study of Hebrew. He was ordained in 1716 by dissenting minister in Derbyshire. In 1733 he became the colleague of the Presbyterian minister in Norwich, and in 1757 was appointed to the divinity chair at Warrington Academy. His reading of Samuel Clarke's Scripture Doctrine of the Trinity, past mid-life, caused a radical change in his theological views. He wrote a number of theological works defending his new views including Scripture Doctrine of Original Sin which elicited the famous reply of Jonathan Edwards Sr. "Especially noteworthy is the Hebrew Concordance (2 vols. folio, London, 1754-57), adapted to the English Bible and disposed after the manner of Buxtorf, which held first rank among works of its kind for almost a century, and is an enduring monument to the author's accuracy and industry."--New Schaff-Herzog Ency. Rel. Knowl. XI:284-85.

The Concordance is organized alphabetically by the Hebrew words, with English explanations of the various meanings. It also includes in the last half of vol. 2 and index to English words keyed to the Hebrew words by number. Also included is Index Vocum Hebraicarum Defectivarum et Anomalarum, followed by A Supplement to the Explication Of some of the Roots in the Concordance, which is followed by Easy Rules For Reading Hebrew.
(17290) 
Price: 650.00 USD
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6 TAYLOR, MENDELL. Fifty Years of Nazarene Missions.
1952, 1956, 1958 bound brown cloth, rubbed some, damp stain on front cover vol. 2. octavo Kansas City, Mo., Beacon Hill Press 
TAYLOR, MENDELL. Fifty Years of Nazarene Missions. Kansas City, Mo., Beacon Hill Press (1952, 1956, 1958) 3 vols.

Maps, bound brown cloth, rubbed some, damp stain on front cover vol. 2.

Includes their missions in India, Japan, China, Korea, Philippines, Mexico, N. Amer. Indians, Africa, Central America, South America, Syria, Jerusalem, Italy, the Caribbean.
12886 
Price: 25.00 USD
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A Further Reply to Dr. Tyler, on the Doctrines of Propagated Depravity, &c., TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
7 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Further Reply to Dr. Tyler, on the Doctrines of Propagated Depravity, &c.
1833 Good Pamphlet Octavo, 15.2 x 24.5cm Boston 
Taylor's Further Reply to Dr. Tyler on the Doctrines of Propagated Depravity, &c., Boston, 1833

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Further Reply to Dr. Tyler, on the Doctrines of Propagated Depravity, &c. By N.W. Taylor. [Boston, 1833] Octavo, 15.2 x 24.5cm. $75.00

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) theologian and educator. Taylor entered Yale in 1800, later studied under Timothy Dwight and was ordained minister of the First Church of Christ, New Haven, 1812. In 1822 upon the formation of the Yale Divinity School, he became Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology, a position he held to within a few weeks of his death. "In order to guard against the idea that man is saved by any merit of his own, Calvinism seemed to exclude any real freedom of choice. Edwards in his treatise on the will in grappling with this difficulty had declared that man has a natural ability to repent but is inhibited by his moral disinclinations; his only freedom is liberty to obey the strongest motive... [Taylor] Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order...he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of the freedom of choice. He denied that our consciousness of freedom is an illusion and asserted that the will is not another name for the strongest motive, but is a power to chose between motives. Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.' To induce men to turn from their evil ways and choose the highest good, appeal must be made to man's natural desire for happiness, which Taylor unfortunately called 'self love.' This self-love will finally become, in a regenerated mind, identical with an unselfish love for God. Such an interpretation of the freedom of the will and the modifications of Calvinism attendant upon it aroused a storm of controversy and divided the churches of New England into 'Taylorites and Tylerites' the adherents of Taylor and of his principal opponent, Bennet Tyler. The debate , passing beyond the borders of New England, became the chief theological reason for the disruption of the Presbyterian Church in 1838."--Charles A. Dinsmore in Dictionary of American Biography, XVIII:338-339. Taylor's "idea of the certainty but not the necessity of man's sin was not outside orthodoxy, and was essential, because his audience no longer knew the Reformation theology, and did not accept the idea of man's 'total depravity.' Taylor exerted a strong influence upon the revivalists, especially Charles G. Finney, whose theological system at Oberlin College, Ohio, 'bore clear marks of Taylorism.'"--Nelson R. Burr: Critical Bibliography of Religion in American, II:994-995. This pamphlet continues the controversy on depravity & regeneration. Taylor had replied to Tyler in his Remarks on propagated depravity and sin as the necessary means of the greatest good, New Haven, 1832. In this pamphlet he continues his thoughts on the doctrines of propagated depravity: "The next subject on which Dr. Tyler questions the consistency and orthodoxy of my views, is the doctrine of Depravity by nature."
Pamphlet in original printed self-title wrapper, lacking rear wrap, fore-edge & bottom edge untrimmed, untrimmed page edges tattered a bit, light foxing. Pagination: [title printed on wrapper, pagination starts with first page of text] [27]-60pp. American Imprints #33-21445. OCLC locates only 2 libraries: Columbia Univ. Libr. & Yale Univ. Libr.
(17732) 
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A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler.  First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833., TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
8 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler. First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833.
1833 Pamphlet, side-stitched Good Pamphlet Octavo, 15.2 x 24.2cm New Haven 
Nathaniel W. Taylor vs. Dr. Tyler on Native Depravity & Regeneration, New Haven, 1833

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler. First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833. New=Haven: Published by Stephen Cooke. Printed by Baldwin & Ellis. [1833] Octavo, 15.2 x 24.2cm. $50.00

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) theologian and educator. Taylor entered Yale in 1800, later studied under Timothy Dwight and was ordained minister of the First Church of Christ, New Haven, 1812. In 1822 upon the formation of the Yale Divinity School, he became Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology, a position he held to within a few weeks of his death. "In order to guard against the idea that man is saved by any merit of his own, Calvinism seemed to exclude any real freedom of choice. Edwards in his treatise on the will in grappling with this difficulty had declared that man has a natural ability to repent but is inhibited by his moral disinclinations; his only freedom is liberty to obey the strongest motive... [Taylor] Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order...he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of the freedom of choice. He denied that our consciousness of freedom is an illusion and asserted that the will is not another name for the strongest motive, but is a power to chose between motives. Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.' To induce men to turn from their evil ways and choose the highest good, appeal must be made to man's natural desire for happiness, which Taylor unfortunately called 'self love.' This self-love will finally become, in a regenerated mind, identical with an unselfish love for God. Such an interpretation of the freedom of the will and the modifications of Calvinism attendant upon it aroused a storm of controversy and divided the churches of New England into 'Taylorites and Tylerites' the adherents of Taylor and of his principal opponent, Bennet Tyler. The debate , passing beyond the borders of New England, became the chief theological reason for the disruption of the Presbyterian Church in 1838."--Charles A. Dinsmore in Dictionary of American Biography, XVIII:338-339. Taylor's "idea of the certainty but not the necessity of man's sin was not outside orthodoxy, and was essential, because his audience no longer knew the Reformation theology, and did not accept the idea of man's 'total depravity.' Taylor exerted a strong influence upon the revivalists, especially Charles G. Finney, whose theological system at Oberlin College, Ohio, 'bore clear marks of Taylorism.'"--Nelson R. Burr: Critical Bibliography of Religion in American, II:994-995. Henry Martyn Dexter: "Collection toward a Bibliography of Congregationalism" #5292. This pamphlet is in reply & reference to Dexter #5193 & #5226, Bennet Tyler's Remarks on Rev. Dr. Taylor's Letter to Dr. Hawes, and Correspondence between Rev. N.W. Taylor, D.D. and Rev. J. Hawes, D.D. The controversy turned around native depravity and regeneration.

Pamphlet, side-stitched, fore-edge and bottom edge not trimmed, untrimmed page edges tattered a bit, title page soiled and worn almost through in several spots, small damp stains in outer margins, light to medium foxing. American Imprints #33-21446.
(17730) 
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An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology.  A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus, TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
9 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus
1829 Good Pamphlet Octavo New Haven, CT 
Nathaniel W. Taylor's An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. New Haven, 1829

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus. New Haven: Printed by Hezekiah Howe. 1829. Octavo.

Pamphlet, disbound and side-stitched, very light foxing. The number "3." written at top of title. Collation: 1-54, 62. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-21 Letter &c, [22]-43 Postscript, (1) blank. The Postscript discusses Mr. Harvey's Review of N.W. Taylor's sermon, Concio ad clerum. Amer. Imprints #38198.

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) Congregational theologian and educator. In 1822 he was appointed Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology in Yale Divinity School. "Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order... he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of freedom of choice... Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.'"--Dict. Amer. Biog., XVIII:338.
(17056) 
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Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination, TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
10 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination
1832 Pamphlet in original printed paper wrapper with t Good Octavo, 15.8 x 24.8cm. Boston 
N.W. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler in the Hawes/Taylor/Tyler Controversy re Native Depravity & Regeneration, Boston, 1832

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination. Boston: Printed by Peirce and Parker, No. 9, Cornhill. 1832. Octavo, 15.8 x 24.8cm. $55.00

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) theologian and educator. Taylor entered Yale in 1800, later studied under Timothy Dwight and was ordained minister of the First Church of Christ, New Haven, 1812. In 1822 upon the formation of the Yale Divinity School, he became Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology, a position he held to within a few weeks of his death. "In order to guard against the idea that man is saved by any merit of his own, Calvinism seemed to exclude any real freedom of choice. Edwards in his treatise on the will in grappling with this difficulty had declared that man has a natural ability to repent but is inhibited by his moral disinclinations; his only freedom is liberty to obey the strongest motive... [Taylor] Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order...he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of the freedom of choice. He denied that our consciousness of freedom is an illusion and asserted that the will is not another name for the strongest motive, but is a power to chose between motives. Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.' To induce men to turn from their evil ways and choose the highest good, appeal must be made to man's natural desire for happiness, which Taylor unfortunately called 'self love.' This self-love will finally become, in a regenerated mind, identical with an unselfish love for God. Such an interpretation of the freedom of the will and the modifications of Calvinism attendant upon it aroused a storm of controversy and divided the churches of New England into 'Taylorites and Tylerites' the adherents of Taylor and of his principal opponent, Bennet Tyler. The debate , passing beyond the borders of New England, became the chief theological reason for the disruption of the Presbyterian Church in 1838."--Charles A. Dinsmore in Dictionary of American Biography, XVIII:338-339. Taylor's "idea of the certainty but not the necessity of man's sin was not outside orthodoxy, and was essential, because his audience no longer knew the Reformation theology, and did not accept the idea of man's 'total depravity.' Taylor exerted a strong influence upon the revivalists, especially Charles G. Finney, whose theological system at Oberlin College, Ohio, 'bore clear marks of Taylorism.'"--Nelson R. Burr: Critical Bibliography of Religion in American, II:994-995. Henry Martyn Dexter: "Collections Toward a Bibliography of Congregationalism" #5227. This controversy, centered around sin/native depravity/regeneration, was started when Taylor reviewed Joel Hawes paper, then Tyler replied to Taylor's review, to which Taylor replies with our pamphlet. Taylor is defending the "orthodoxy" of his positions.

Pamphlet in original printed paper wrapper with title printed on front wrap, side stitched, fore-edge & bottom edge not trimmed, untrimmed page edges tattered a bit, wrapper soiled a bit, large damp stain in upper right hand corner of pages, light foxing. Pagination: [title printed on wrapper, pagination starts with first page of text] [1]-24pp. Small errata slip pasted to bottom of p.24. American Imprints#32-14935.
(17731) 
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