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PSYCHOLOGY

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PSYCHOLOGY

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An Elegant and Learned Discourse Of the Light of Nature, With Several other Treatises: Viz. The Schisme. The Act of Oblivion. The Childes Returne. The Panting Soul. Mount Ebal. The White Stone. Spiritual Opticks. The Worth of Souls., CULVERWEL, NATHANAEL
1 CULVERWEL, NATHANAEL An Elegant and Learned Discourse Of the Light of Nature, With Several other Treatises: Viz. The Schisme. The Act of Oblivion. The Childes Returne. The Panting Soul. Mount Ebal. The White Stone. Spiritual Opticks. The Worth of Souls.
1st Edition of Culverwel's Light of Nature, London, 1652. "A treatise of remarkable eloquence, power and learning by a Cambridge Platonist" 1652 First Edition Leather Good+ Book Quarto. 15 x 19cm. London 
"A treatise of remarkable eloquence, power and learning by a Cambridge Platonist" 1st Edition of Culverwel's Light of Nature, London, 1652


CULVERWEL, NATHANAEL. An Elegant and Learned Discourse Of the Light of Nature, With Several other Treatises: Viz. The Schisme. The Act of Oblivion. The Childes Returne. The Panting Soul. Mount Ebal. The White Stone. Spiritual Opticks. The Worth of Souls. By Nathanael Culverwel, Master of Arts, and lately Fellow of Emanuel Colledge in Cambridge. Imprimatur, Edm. Calamy. London, Printed by T. R[atcliffe]. and E. M[ottershed]. for John Rothwell at the Sun and Fountain in Pauls Church-yard. 1652. Quarto. 15 x 19 x 3.7cm (binding). $375.00

Nathanael Culverwel (1615-1651) "An English philosophical writer, belonging to the school known as the `Cambridge Platonists.' His chief work, the Discourse of the Light of Nature, was published with several smaller treatises in 1652. It seems to have been suggested by the De veritate of his contemporary Lord Herbert of Cherbury, with whose views on epistemology he coincides to a remarkable degree, though controverting his attack upon Christianity from the side of reason. For grandeur and harmony of conception, as well as for rare insight and spiritual rapture which is almost the only trace of the Calvinism in which he was apparently brought up, the book is one of the most striking productions of the Cambridge school. Its main theme is the use of reason and the special nobility of its function in the search after truth..."--New Schaff-Herzog Ency. Religious Knowledge, III:320.

"Like the other Cambridge Platonists, Culverwell held that reason and faith are compatible.... Culverwell was the only member of the Cambridge Platonists to invoke natural law theory as the foundation of his rational ethics. His founding of the legal authority of moral law in the will of God and in the cognitive capacities of human beings has resulted in his being considered a precursor of Locke, major differences between them notwithstanding... The `light of nature' of the book's title is human reason, the `intellectual lamp' placed by God in the human soul to enable mankind to understand the law of nature. According to Culverwell the `law of nature' is the imprint of divine law in rational beings. While he acknowledged the limitations of postlapsarian human reason, he was optimistic about human capacities, emphasizing reason and free will as preconditions for knowledge of the moral law and the obligation to obey it. For this purpose, all human minds are furnished with `clear and indelible' principles of reason and morality. He conceived of God as an intellectual being who communicates with man through reason. Like Whichcote, he argued that men become more like God through the exercise of their reason. In coming to a knowledge of God and the eternal law, our reason is aided by experience of the external world which manifests God's wisdom in the fixed order of divine providence..."--Sarah Hutton, `Culverwell, Nathaniel (bap. 1619, d. 1651)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/6885, accessed 15 May 2014] Newly rebound with original paneled speckled calf laid over boards, spine with raised bands and gilt lettering, new endpapers, light foxing. Title printed within simple woodcut border, woodcut head & tailpieces. Collation: A4, [a]4, B-Z4, Aa-Ee4. A-X4, Y2, Z4, Aa-Dd4. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, (3) Epistle Dedicatory, (1) blank, (4) To the Reader, (1) contents, (1) errata, (3) Courteous Reader, (1) blank, 1-215, (1) blank, Light of Nature. 1-24 The Schisme(caption title); 25-45 The Acto of Oblivion; 46-64 The Childs Return; 65-80 The Panting Soul; 80-96 Mount Ebal; 97-172 The White Stone...Treatise of Assurance; 173-212 Spiritual Opticks: or A Glasse Discovering the weakness and imperfection of Christians knowledge in this life. London, 1652. Online ESTC Citation No. R13398. Wing (CD-Rom, 1996), C7569. Spiritual Opticks has a separate title page with imprint. Pagination and register are continuous in the second section. (17755) 
Price: 450.00 USD
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A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections, In Three Parts; Part I. Concerning the Nature of the Affections, and their Importance in Religion.  Part II. Shewing what are no certain Signs that religious Affections are gracious, or that they are not.  Part III. Shewing what are distinguishing Signs of truly gracious and holy Affections., EDWARDS, JONATHAN.
2 EDWARDS, JONATHAN. A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections, In Three Parts; Part I. Concerning the Nature of the Affections, and their Importance in Religion. Part II. Shewing what are no certain Signs that religious Affections are gracious, or that they are not. Part III. Shewing what are distinguishing Signs of truly gracious and holy Affections.
1746 First Edition Leather Book Octavo, 14 x 20 x 3cm binding; 13.2 x 19.5cm page Boston 
Jonathan Edwards' Treatise Concerning Religious Affections, First Edition, 1746


EDWARDS, JONATHAN. A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections, In Three Parts; Part I. Concerning the Nature of the Affections, and their Importance in Religion. Part II. Shewing what are no certain Signs that religious Affections are gracious, or that they are not. Part III. Shewing what are distinguishing Signs of truly gracious and holy Affections. By Jonathan Edwards, A.M. And Pastor of the first Church in Northampton. [11 lines of scripture texts] Boston: Printed for S. Kneeland and T. Green in Queen-street, over against the Prison. 1746. Octavo, 14 x 20 x 3cm binding; 13.2 x 19.5cm page block. $1,500.00

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758) Congregational clergyman, theologian, philosopher. "During the rise of enthusiasm in New England in the Great Awakening, Edwards fused Calvinism, Plotonism, Pietism, and Lockean empiricism into a system of religious philosophy. In it the absolute sovereignty of God beomes an 'inward, sweet delight,' not through reason but by an additional or sixth sense... The claim of Edwards to be the founder of the New England 'school' of 'Reformed Divinity' is based upon three works... Freedom of the Will... The Great Christian Doctrine of Original Sin Defended...and A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections... These works, with some other writings, reveal Edwards the philosopher, Lockean pyschologist, and empirical thinker, who used the new philosophy to bolster traditional theology, to become 'the eighteenth-century philosophical apologist for the truths of the Christian religion'"--Nelson R. Burr: A Critical Bibliography of Religion in America, 2 vols. 1961, pp979-980.

Re The Treatise Concering Religious Affections, we quote the Dict of Amer. Biography: "Since, however, in Connecticut and central Massachusetts, revivals resulted in social cleavage and church divisions with partisan conflict between exponents of religion as violent emotion and those who regarded it as rectitude of conduct, Edwards needed to intervene further by a series of sermons in 1742-43 which became A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections, published in 1746. This is the supreme expression of Edwards's psychology of religion. The mind has two activities: understanding, and inclination or will, the latter having inseparable aspects of affections and choice, since man wills what he loves. True religion involves both activities. While in great part it consists in holy affections, there must also be light to the understanding implied in all reasonable affections. At great length he cautions against reliance on mere intensity of feeling, on its effect on the body, on fervor of speech, or on a confidence in righteousness which may be only exalted natural feeling..."--Dict. Amer. Biography, VI:34.

Bound full sheep, double panel in constrasting brown, rubbed & scuffed, old 8cm long scrape on front cover, recently professionaly rebacked and top two corners recornered, spine with raised bands outlined by single fillets to match original spine, light to medium foxing, mark-off from turn-ins on endpapers, front free endpaper just slightly tattered along fore-edge.

Note: this binding closely matches binding #8 (a Boston 1747 binding) in Frederick E. Masers's Bookbinding in America 1680-1910, p.46.

Early signatures on top of front free endpaper: "Josph Fisks - 27/0 Dom: 1747" and also "Joseph Fisk's Book Dom 1764."

Collation: [A]4, B-Y8, Z4, *4. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [i]-vi preface, 1-343 text, (1) errors to be corrected, (8) A Table of the Contents of the foregoing Treatise. Verso of the last page contains "The Booksellers Advertisement." Evans: Amer. Bibliography #5767. Johnson: Printed Writings of Jonathan Edwards #97. First Edition.
(17918) 
Price: 1500.00 USD
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3 GEHRING Hope of the Variant.

GEHRING, JOHN GEORGE. The Hope of the Variant. NY, Scribner's, 1924, x, 252pp., bound publisher's green cloth with gilt lettering on spine and front cover--spine lettering faded some, many small mottled spots where varnish has come out of the cloth, light foxing. Re: psychoanalysis. 
Price: 6.00 USD
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