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1 ANONYMOUS. Important Hints Respecting the Misery of Man, the Way of Salvation, an
1802 Pamphlet 
ANONYMOUS. Important Hints Respecting the Misery of Man, the Way of Salvation, and the Work of the Spirit. Edinburgh: Printed by J. Ritchie, for the Society for Publishing Religious Tracts. 1802. 12mo, 10 x 16.4cm.

Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched, light foxing, pages tanning a bit, three small marginal chips on last leaf. Collation: title leaf, A1-6, 1 unsigned leaf. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-16pp.

Apparently unrecorded. I did not find it in OCLC, COPAC, British Library.

The anonymous author spends the bulk of the pamphlet discussing the state of man, i.e, in misery, before moving on to salvation and the work of the Spirit.
(17065) 
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Summula Caietani, S. Xisti, Cardinalis Illustrissimo, ordinis Prędicatorum.  Per auam Docta, Compendiose resoluta, atque secundum S. Sancti Oecumenici, & Generalis Concilij Tridentini, & canones, & capita castigatissima., CAJETAN, THOMAS.
2 CAJETAN, THOMAS. Summula Caietani, S. Xisti, Cardinalis Illustrissimo, ordinis Prędicatorum. Per auam Docta, Compendiose resoluta, atque secundum S. Sancti Oecumenici, & Generalis Concilij Tridentini, & canones, & capita castigatissima.
1584 Vellum Book Octavo, 10.1 x 14.9cm. Venice 
Luther Opponent Thomas Cajetan, on Sin and Confession, Venice, 1584

CAJETAN, THOMAS. Summula Caietani, S. Xisti, Cardinalis Illustrissimo, ordinis Prędicatorum. Per auam Docta, Compendiose resoluta, atque secundum S. Sancti Oecumenici, & Generalis Concilij Tridentini, & canones, & capita castigatissima. Additis (vt vocant) Summarijs, & copiosa rerum pręcipuarum Indice. [woodcut device] Venetiis, Apud Dominicum Farreum. MDLXXXIIII. [1584] Octavo, 10.1 x 14.9cm. $650.00

Thomas Cajetan (Tommaso de Vio Cajetan, 1469-1534) Dominican cardinal, philosopher, theologian and exegete. "As General of his order (1508-18), Cardinal (1517), and Bishop of Gaeta (1519) he played an important part in ecclesiastical affairs, urging the cause of reform before the fathers of the Lateran Council of 1512, reasoning with Luther in 1518, contributing to the elections of the Emp. Charles V (1519) and the Pope Hadrian VI (1522) and opposing the projected divorce of Henry VIII (1430)...In philosophy and theology his acute but conservative Commentary on St. Thomas's 'Summa theologica' (1507-22) was the first monument of a great revival of Thomism in the 16th century, and remains to-day one of the chief classics of scholasticism. Finding that Humanists and Protestants alike were making polemical use of the Scriptures, he subsequently turned to Biblical exegesis, for which he sought the assistance of scholarly philologists; and his commentaries on the Bible contain much enlightened criticism of an unexpectedly 'modern' kind. To Clement VII he was the 'lamp of the Church,' and everywhere in his career, as the theological light of Italy, he was heard with respect and pleasure by cardinals, universities, the clergy, nobility, and people."--Cross: Oxford Dict. of the Christian Church, p.216. The Catholic Ency. presents Cajetan as "Always obedient, and submitting his works to ecclesiastical authority, he presented a striking contrast to the leaders of heresy and revolt, whom he strove to save from their folly."--Catholic Ency., 1913, II:147. "In 1518 he was sent as legate to the Diet of Augsburg, and to him, at the wish of the Saxon elector, was entrusted the task of examining and testing the teachings of Luther. Treatises of his own, written, without knowledge of Luther's theses, in 1517 show that Luther was justified in his assertion that on the doctrine of dispensation the Church had as yet arrived at no firmly established position; the doctrine of confession Cajetan seemed also to regard as a subject open on controversy. Yet more than investigator and thinker he was politician and prelate, and his appearance at Augsburg in all the splendor of ecclesiastical pomp only served to reveal him to Luther as the type of Roman curialist, hateful to Germans and German Christianity."--T. Kolde in New Schaff-Herzog. Ency. of Religious Knowledge II:338.

Bound early vellum, professionally restored with new vellum bottom half of spine and new vellum cords, new headband & tailband, early neat hand lettering on spine, early lettering on top page edges, contents with scattered light foxing, small marginal tear repaired; clean. Collation: *8, **8, A-Z8, Aa-Pp8. Last leaf is blank. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, (3) dedication to Clement VII, (10) index, (1) blank, (16) repertorum alphabeticum, [1]-606pp, (2) blank. Not in OCLC. However OCLC lists 2 libraries with a Venice 1584 edition, but printed by Nicolini not Farreum. It is also 16mo and with different collation & pagination.

We offer Cajetan's work on sin and confession, in a somewhat scarce Venice 1584 imprint.
(17027) 
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3 ENGLES Evils of a Deficient Conviction of Sin: A Sermon Delivered before the
19TH-AM-PA-PHILA 
ENGLES, WILLIAM M. Evils of a Deficient Conviction of Sin: A Sermon Delivered before the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, on the 20th Day of May, 1841, in the Seventh Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. By William M. Engles, D.D., Moderator of the Assembly. Philadelphia. 1841. 3? x 6? inches. Pamphlet in printed paper wrapper-wrapper printed within decorative border, library accession number on top of title, withdrawn stamp on bottom front cover & p.3, light scattered foxing, very small dog-ear broken off front cover. 28pp. American Imprints #41-1784 [MH-And; PPPrHi.] William M. Engles (1797-1867) Presbyterian pastor of Seventh Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, resigned 1834 on account of diseased throat, became editor of Presbyterian for 33 years, editor of Board of Publication. "Dr. Engles owed his reputation more to his pen than to his pulpit efforts...the Board of Publication was more indebted than to any other individual, according to its own acknowledgment." 
Price: 35.00 USD
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A Review of Dr. Woods' Letters to Dr. Taylor, on the Permission of Sin.  Together with Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Same Subject.  First Published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator, for September 1830., FITCH, ELIAZAR THOMPSON
4 FITCH, ELIAZAR THOMPSON A Review of Dr. Woods' Letters to Dr. Taylor, on the Permission of Sin. Together with Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Same Subject. First Published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator, for September 1830.
New Haven Theology: Fitch's Review of Dr. Woods' Letters to Dr. Taylor, New Haven, 1830 Pamphlet, side-stitched with printed tan wrapper Good Octavo, 15x23.5cm New Haven, CT 
FITCH, ELEAZAR THOMPSON. A Review of Dr. Woods' Letters to Dr. Taylor, on the Permission of Sin. Together with Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Same Subject. First Published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator, for September 1830. New-Haven: Baldwin and Treadway, printers. 1830. Octavo in 4's, 15 x 23.5cm. $60.00 Eleazar Thompson Fitch (1791-1871) educator, lecturer, author. Fitch graduated from Yale in 1810; entered Andover Theol Seminary in 1812 where, "after completing the regular course, he remained, pursing advanced studies, giving assistance in instruction, and preaching, until his election, in 1817, to succeed President Dwight in the office of professor of divinity at Yale... He delivered to successive classes a series of sermons in systematic theology, and some of his doctrinal views thus presented becoming publicly controverted, he was compelled to defend them publicly."--Appletons' Cyclopļæ½dia of American Biography, II:470. In this pamphlet Fitch defends Nathaniel W. Taylor, who was his colleague at Yale. Regarding the authorship of this pamphlet, 1 OCLC entry (7 libraries) attributes it to Eleazar T. Fitch. 2 other OCLC entries (25 libraries) attribute it to N.W. Taylor himself based on Sidney Earl Mead: Nathaniel William Taylor, 1786-1858, Chicago, 1942, p.248 and also Franklin B. Dexter's Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, New Haven, 1912, 6:161. However, the pamphlet refers to "Dr. Taylor" in the third person, whereas other pamphlets of Taylor in this controversy use the first person. I think it likely that Fitch was the author and not Taylor. American Imprints #30-1386 also lists it under Fitch. "The Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Permission of Sin, are attributed to Luther Hart, editor of the Quarterly Christian Spectator, and they are in response to Joseph Bellamy's The Wisdom of God in the Permission of Sin, as published in Bellamy's Works, v. 2, 1811"--OCLC. The pamphlet itself states in a footnote on the first page of the Review of Dr. Woods' Letters, "These remarks were originally subjoined to a review of Dr. Bellamy's Treatise on the permission of sin, which was passing through the press, at the time when Dr. Woods' Letter to Dr. Taylor were received. As the subject of these Letters is more immediately interesting to the public at the present time, we have here placed our remarks upon them first, and have subjoined the review of Dr. Bellamy, because it is frequently alluded to in our examination of Dr. Woods' Letters."--p.3. Pamphlet, side-stitched with printed tan wrapper, along spine strip wrapper is tattered and about half worn away, bottom & fore-edges untrimmed, light to medium foxing. Collation: 1-64, 71. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-39 Review of Dr. Woods' Letters, [40]-50 Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Permission of Sin." (17721) 
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An Examination of a Review of Dr. Taylor's Sermon on Human Depravity, and Mr. Harvey's Strictures on that Sermon, HARVEY, JOSEPH
5 HARVEY, JOSEPH An Examination of a Review of Dr. Taylor's Sermon on Human Depravity, and Mr. Harvey's Strictures on that Sermon
1829 Good Pamphlet Octavo Hartford, CT 
Harvey's Examination of a Review of Dr. Taylor's Sermon on Human Depravity, Hartford, 1829

[HARVEY, JOSEPH]. An Examination of a Review of Dr. Taylor's Sermon on Human Depravity, and Mr. Harvey's Strictures on that Sermon. Hartford: Printed by Goodwin & Co., 1829. Octavo. $45.00

Joseph Harvey (1787-1873) Congregational minister. This pamphlet is attributed to Harvey in Franklin B. Dexter's Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College... 1912, v.6, p.201. Dexter also states that the review of Dr. Taylor's sermon, first published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator for June 1829 and later in a pamphlet, was written jointly by Chauncey A. Goodrich and Noah Porter. The reviewers Goodrich & Porter, based there review on Harvey's previously published "Strictures." So in this anonymously published examination of the Review, Harvey is in large measure defending & clarifying his own words. The controversy was about N.W. Taylor's theory of sin, moral agency & divine government. He summarizes his objections to Taylor's theology: "The peculiar feature, and what many will consider, the radical error of this theory, is the assumption, that all moral depravity consists in a free preference of the world to God. That such a preference is a consequence and an evidence of depravity, none will deny. But to say, that this preference is the root and source of the evil, is placing the subject on new ground, and seriously affecting all the great doctrines of the Gospel, which stand related to human depravity."--p.44.

Disbound pamphlet side-stitched with new linen thread, light foxing. Collation: 1-74. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-53pp, (3)pp blank.
(17293) 
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Letters on the Present State and Probable Results of Theological Speculations in Connecticut, HARVEY, JOSEPH.
6 HARVEY, JOSEPH. Letters on the Present State and Probable Results of Theological Speculations in Connecticut
1832 Good Pamphlet Octavo, 12.8 x 21.3cm Hartford, CT 
Joseph Harvey writing Against Nathaniel W. Taylor, 1832

HARVEY, JOSEPH. Letters on the Present State and Probable Results of Theological Speculations in Connecticut. By an Edwardean. [No place, no publisher; Hartford?] 1832. Octavo, 12.8 x 21.3cm.$45.00

Joseph Harvey (1787-1873) Congregational minister. In this pamphlet Harvey responds to either real or literary questions of a friend concerning the theological opinions of Nathaniel W. Taylor. Harvey stated that "Dr. Taylor's creed exhibits some of the peculiarities of Pelagianism: (e.g.) Peleagius denied original sin, or native depravity. So does Taylor."--p.25. Harvey also argues that the Theological Seminary had known years of harmony and revivals of religion. However, "this harmony and prosperity continued to increase until Dr. Taylor came into the field. And since that time the seeds of alienation and division have been industriously sown, and have produced a rapid growth and an early harvest."--p.27.

Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched, light to medium foxing. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-44pp. American Imprints 32-13392, with 44pp and only MWA. #32-12841 with 40pp.
(17734) 
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A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler.  First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833., TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
7 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler. First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833.
1833 Pamphlet, side-stitched Good Pamphlet Octavo, 15.2 x 24.2cm New Haven 
Nathaniel W. Taylor vs. Dr. Tyler on Native Depravity & Regeneration, New Haven, 1833

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler. First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833. New=Haven: Published by Stephen Cooke. Printed by Baldwin & Ellis. [1833] Octavo, 15.2 x 24.2cm. $50.00

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) theologian and educator. Taylor entered Yale in 1800, later studied under Timothy Dwight and was ordained minister of the First Church of Christ, New Haven, 1812. In 1822 upon the formation of the Yale Divinity School, he became Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology, a position he held to within a few weeks of his death. "In order to guard against the idea that man is saved by any merit of his own, Calvinism seemed to exclude any real freedom of choice. Edwards in his treatise on the will in grappling with this difficulty had declared that man has a natural ability to repent but is inhibited by his moral disinclinations; his only freedom is liberty to obey the strongest motive... [Taylor] Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order...he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of the freedom of choice. He denied that our consciousness of freedom is an illusion and asserted that the will is not another name for the strongest motive, but is a power to chose between motives. Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.' To induce men to turn from their evil ways and choose the highest good, appeal must be made to man's natural desire for happiness, which Taylor unfortunately called 'self love.' This self-love will finally become, in a regenerated mind, identical with an unselfish love for God. Such an interpretation of the freedom of the will and the modifications of Calvinism attendant upon it aroused a storm of controversy and divided the churches of New England into 'Taylorites and Tylerites' the adherents of Taylor and of his principal opponent, Bennet Tyler. The debate , passing beyond the borders of New England, became the chief theological reason for the disruption of the Presbyterian Church in 1838."--Charles A. Dinsmore in Dictionary of American Biography, XVIII:338-339. Taylor's "idea of the certainty but not the necessity of man's sin was not outside orthodoxy, and was essential, because his audience no longer knew the Reformation theology, and did not accept the idea of man's 'total depravity.' Taylor exerted a strong influence upon the revivalists, especially Charles G. Finney, whose theological system at Oberlin College, Ohio, 'bore clear marks of Taylorism.'"--Nelson R. Burr: Critical Bibliography of Religion in American, II:994-995. Henry Martyn Dexter: "Collection toward a Bibliography of Congregationalism" #5292. This pamphlet is in reply & reference to Dexter #5193 & #5226, Bennet Tyler's Remarks on Rev. Dr. Taylor's Letter to Dr. Hawes, and Correspondence between Rev. N.W. Taylor, D.D. and Rev. J. Hawes, D.D. The controversy turned around native depravity and regeneration.

Pamphlet, side-stitched, fore-edge and bottom edge not trimmed, untrimmed page edges tattered a bit, title page soiled and worn almost through in several spots, small damp stains in outer margins, light to medium foxing. American Imprints #33-21446.
(17730) 
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An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology.  A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus, TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
8 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus
1829 Good Pamphlet Octavo New Haven, CT 
Nathaniel W. Taylor's An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. New Haven, 1829

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus. New Haven: Printed by Hezekiah Howe. 1829. Octavo.

Pamphlet, disbound and side-stitched, very light foxing. The number "3." written at top of title. Collation: 1-54, 62. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-21 Letter &c, [22]-43 Postscript, (1) blank. The Postscript discusses Mr. Harvey's Review of N.W. Taylor's sermon, Concio ad clerum. Amer. Imprints #38198.

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) Congregational theologian and educator. In 1822 he was appointed Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology in Yale Divinity School. "Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order... he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of freedom of choice... Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.'"--Dict. Amer. Biog., XVIII:338.
(17056) 
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Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination, TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
9 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination
1832 Pamphlet in original printed paper wrapper with t Good Octavo, 15.8 x 24.8cm. Boston 
N.W. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler in the Hawes/Taylor/Tyler Controversy re Native Depravity & Regeneration, Boston, 1832

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination. Boston: Printed by Peirce and Parker, No. 9, Cornhill. 1832. Octavo, 15.8 x 24.8cm. $55.00

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) theologian and educator. Taylor entered Yale in 1800, later studied under Timothy Dwight and was ordained minister of the First Church of Christ, New Haven, 1812. In 1822 upon the formation of the Yale Divinity School, he became Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology, a position he held to within a few weeks of his death. "In order to guard against the idea that man is saved by any merit of his own, Calvinism seemed to exclude any real freedom of choice. Edwards in his treatise on the will in grappling with this difficulty had declared that man has a natural ability to repent but is inhibited by his moral disinclinations; his only freedom is liberty to obey the strongest motive... [Taylor] Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order...he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of the freedom of choice. He denied that our consciousness of freedom is an illusion and asserted that the will is not another name for the strongest motive, but is a power to chose between motives. Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.' To induce men to turn from their evil ways and choose the highest good, appeal must be made to man's natural desire for happiness, which Taylor unfortunately called 'self love.' This self-love will finally become, in a regenerated mind, identical with an unselfish love for God. Such an interpretation of the freedom of the will and the modifications of Calvinism attendant upon it aroused a storm of controversy and divided the churches of New England into 'Taylorites and Tylerites' the adherents of Taylor and of his principal opponent, Bennet Tyler. The debate , passing beyond the borders of New England, became the chief theological reason for the disruption of the Presbyterian Church in 1838."--Charles A. Dinsmore in Dictionary of American Biography, XVIII:338-339. Taylor's "idea of the certainty but not the necessity of man's sin was not outside orthodoxy, and was essential, because his audience no longer knew the Reformation theology, and did not accept the idea of man's 'total depravity.' Taylor exerted a strong influence upon the revivalists, especially Charles G. Finney, whose theological system at Oberlin College, Ohio, 'bore clear marks of Taylorism.'"--Nelson R. Burr: Critical Bibliography of Religion in American, II:994-995. Henry Martyn Dexter: "Collections Toward a Bibliography of Congregationalism" #5227. This controversy, centered around sin/native depravity/regeneration, was started when Taylor reviewed Joel Hawes paper, then Tyler replied to Taylor's review, to which Taylor replies with our pamphlet. Taylor is defending the "orthodoxy" of his positions.

Pamphlet in original printed paper wrapper with title printed on front wrap, side stitched, fore-edge & bottom edge not trimmed, untrimmed page edges tattered a bit, wrapper soiled a bit, large damp stain in upper right hand corner of pages, light foxing. Pagination: [title printed on wrapper, pagination starts with first page of text] [1]-24pp. Small errata slip pasted to bottom of p.24. American Imprints#32-14935.
(17731) 
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A Letter to the Editor of the Spirit of the Pilgrims.  To which are Added Remarks on a Recent Letter of Dr. Taylor in the Christian Spectator, TYLER, BENNET
10 TYLER, BENNET A Letter to the Editor of the Spirit of the Pilgrims. To which are Added Remarks on a Recent Letter of Dr. Taylor in the Christian Spectator
1833 Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched Good Pamphlet Octavo Portland, Maine 
New England Theology, Bennet Tyler's reply to Nathaniel W. Taylor, Portland, Maine, 1833

TYLER, BENNET. A Letter to the Editor of the Spirit of the Pilgrims. To which are Added Remarks on a Recent Letter of Dr. Taylor in the Christian Spectator. By Bennet Tyler, D.D. Pastor of the Second Congregational Church in Portland, Me. Portland: Printed by Merrill and Byram. 1833. Octavo. $50.00

Bennet Tyler (1783-1858) American Congregational pastor, theologian, educator. President of Dartmouth College for 6 years, first President and professor of Christian theology of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, leader of the `Old School' Calvinists. "In this same year [1828] a sermon preached by Dr. Nathaniel W. Taylor at the Yale Commencement let loose a flood of theological controversy among the New England churches, especially in Connecticut, between the 'Old School' Calvinists and the 'New Divinity' as promulgated from New Haven. Being an ardent conservative and one of the ablest interpreters of the old theology, Tyler was drawn into the debate and became a recognized leader of conservative orthodoxy. On Sept. 10, 1833, forty ministers met in East Windsor, Conn., and resolved to establish a theological seminary--if twenty thousand dollars could be raised--to counteract, as far as possible, the harmful effects of the 'New Divinity as taught in New Haven. The money was raised in a few weeks, the corner-stone of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, now the Hartford Theological Seminary, was laid May 13, 1834, and Tyler was inducted into office as president and professor of Christian theology on the same day. This position he held for twenty-three years, resigning on account of the infirmities of age July 16, 1857... Not an original or speculative thinker, Tyler dwelt contentedly in the Calvinistic system as modified by Jonathan Edwards and tempered by Timothy Dwight"--Dict. Amer. Biog. XIX:85. In this pamphlet Tyler continues the now 5 year controversy with Nathaniel W. Taylor, re Taylor misrepresentations of Tyler's theological positions relative to sin and other doctrines.

Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched, mostly light foxing but with title and last page much heavier foxing. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-40pp. Amer. Imprints #21589.
(17158) 
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