Quick Search

Author
Title
Description
Keyword
Book Number
 
 
 
 

NEW ENGLAND THEOLOGY

 - 16 items found in your search
NEW ENGLAND THEOLOGY

Click on Title to view full description

 
1 ANONYMOUS. Review of Dr. Dana's Remonstrance Respecting Andover Theological Sem
19TH-AM-MA-BOSTON-CROCKER & BREWSTER 
ANONYMOUS. A Review of Dr. Dana's Remonstrance Respecting Andover Theological Seminary. By a Layman. Boston: Press of Crocker and Brewster, 47, Washington-street. 1853. Octavo. Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched, light to medium foxing. Collation: 1-54. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-40pp. The pamphlet was written in response to one written by Daniel Dana in 1849: "A Remonstrance Addressed to the Trustees of Phillips Academy, on the state of the Theological Seminary under their care." It concerns primarily the chair of Christian Theology held by Edwards Amasa Park and whether doctrinally and instructionally it met the conditions of the founders set down in the constitution of the institution. Dana decried the fact that Andover Seminary candidates for a license to preach often "failed in some essential points; particularly that of native depravity."(p.6). The author asserts that because neither the seminary nor the ministers have followed up on Dana's concerns, it is left to the laymen and hence his pamphlet. The anonymous author sides with Dana in considering Dr. Parks views as inconsistent with the constitution of Andover. An appendix (pp.33-40) includes: Note A: The Covenant with Adam, and Original Sin; Note B: Atonement; Note C: Regeneration; Note D: Human Ability. These notes treat specifically on Dr. Park's views on the delineated subjects. 
Price: 40.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
An Essay on the Nature and Glory of the Gospel ofJesus Christ, BELLAMY, JOSEPH
2 BELLAMY, JOSEPH An Essay on the Nature and Glory of the Gospel ofJesus Christ
Joseph Bellamy's An Essay on the Nature and Glory of theGospel of Jesus Christ, Boston, 1762, First Edition 1762 First Edition leather good+ 12mo in 6's; 10.7 x 16.6cm, Boston Early signature on front free endpaper: "Daniel E
BELLAMY, JOSEPH. An Essay on the Nature and Glory of the Gospel of Jesus Christ: As also on The Nature and Consequences of Spiritual Blindness: and The Nature and Effects of Divine Illumination. Designed as a Supplement to the Author's Letters and Dialogues on the Nature of Love to God, Faith in Christ, and Assurance of a Title to Eternal Life. By Joseph Bellamy, A.M. Minister of the Gospel in Behlem, in New-England. "We all with open Face, beholding as in a Glass "the Glory of the Lord, are changed into the "same Image. "But if our Gospel is hid, it is hid to them that "are lost. Boston, N.E. Printed and Sold by S. Kneeland, in Queen street, opposite to the Probate Office. 1762, 12mo in 6's, 10.7 x 16.6cm. $550.00 Joseph Bellamy(1719-1790) ardent disciple of Jonathan Edwards and earliest and most faithful of his successors. "He was full of enthusiasm for the Great Awakening, and for the New Light theology inaugurated by Jonathan Edwards, which had been the occasion of the revival, since it enabled the preacher to call men to repentance, as the older Calvinism had not. In this vein he preached with fervor, cogency, and success, first to his own parish, and from 1742 on, from place to place in and around Connecticut for part of the year, during several years... Settling down at the close of the revival he bagan writing in defense of this new theology... Young men came to him to study for the ministry, and a sort of theological seminary grew up in this tiny backwwods settlement... He was a striking example of bold independent thinking in early New England."--Dictionary of American Biography, II:165. We offer the First Edition of his An Essay on the Nature and Glory of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. A few quotes from the book: "Section VI. Vindictive Justice an amiable Perfection the Diety; a Beauty in the Divine Character. Vindictive Justice is that Perfection in the Divine Nature, whereby God is inclined to punish Sin according to it's Desert...God's giving his Son to die in our Stead, to redeem us from the Curse of the Law, as led some to think, that God is not inclinded to punish Sinc according to it's Desert: whereas his Inclination to punish Sin according to it's Desert, induced him to give his Son to die in our Stead."--p.95. "Section XI. The Nature of Divine Illumination... To see the Holy Beauty of God's moral Character, to see the Beauty of Holiness, to have Holiness appear beautiful and seem lovely to the Soul, is of the same Nature as to love Holiness; but to love Holiness, is Holiness it self."--pp.201, 205-206. Bound original calf with raised bands and double gilt fine fillet lines outlining bands and red morocco title label, covers scuffed and rubbed some, endpapers split at inside hinges but hinges tight, light tanning of pages, light foxing but a bit heavier on endpaeprs. Collation: A6, a2, B-Y6, Z2. D3 mis-signed C3. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [i]-vi Preface, (8) Contents, [1]-254pp. (2) vi (8) 254pp. Evans: American Bibliography #9064. Early signature on front free endpaper: "Daniel Emerson's." 
Price: 550.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
3 DWIGHT, SERENO EDWARDS. Life of President Edwards: By S. E. Dwight.
1830 Bound original calf covered boards recently rebacked with heavy brown acid-free paper with printed paper title label, leather covers very dry, scuffed & chipped, worn through leather at corners, heavy foxing of endpapers, light to medium foxing of most of contents with some pages of heavier foxing. book Octavo New York: G. & C. & H. Carvill 
DWIGHT, SERENO EDWARDS. Life of President Edwards: By S. E. Dwight. New York: G. & C. & H. Carvill, 1830. Octavo.

Bound original calf covered boards, recently rebacked with heavy brown acid-free paper with printed paper title label, leather covers very dry, scuffed & chipped, worn through leather at corners, heavy foxing of endpapers, light to medium foxing of most of contents with some pages of heavier foxing. Collation: 1-964; last leaf blank. Pagination: (1) title, (1) copyright, [3]-4 preface, [5]-8 contents, [9]-766pp, (2) blank.

Sereno Edwards Dwight (1786-1850) educator, clergyman, fifth of eight sons of Timothy Dwight. "Assisted by his wife, he worked for many years editing the complete writings of his great-grandfather, Jonathan Edwards; Edwards's Memoirs of the Rev. David Brainerd was published in 1822, and ten subsequent volumes, one a memoir of the great divine, were published in 1830 as The Works of President Edwards: with a Memoir of his Life. We offer the Memoir by the great grandson. 
Price: 85.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
A Review of Dr. Woods' Letters to Dr. Taylor, on the Permission of Sin.  Together with Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Same Subject.  First Published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator, for September 1830., FITCH, ELIAZAR THOMPSON
4 FITCH, ELIAZAR THOMPSON A Review of Dr. Woods' Letters to Dr. Taylor, on the Permission of Sin. Together with Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Same Subject. First Published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator, for September 1830.
New Haven Theology: Fitch's Review of Dr. Woods' Letters to Dr. Taylor, New Haven, 1830 Pamphlet, side-stitched with printed tan wrapper Good Octavo, 15x23.5cm New Haven, CT 
FITCH, ELEAZAR THOMPSON. A Review of Dr. Woods' Letters to Dr. Taylor, on the Permission of Sin. Together with Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Same Subject. First Published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator, for September 1830. New-Haven: Baldwin and Treadway, printers. 1830. Octavo in 4's, 15 x 23.5cm. $60.00 Eleazar Thompson Fitch (1791-1871) educator, lecturer, author. Fitch graduated from Yale in 1810; entered Andover Theol Seminary in 1812 where, "after completing the regular course, he remained, pursing advanced studies, giving assistance in instruction, and preaching, until his election, in 1817, to succeed President Dwight in the office of professor of divinity at Yale... He delivered to successive classes a series of sermons in systematic theology, and some of his doctrinal views thus presented becoming publicly controverted, he was compelled to defend them publicly."--Appletons' Cyclop´┐Żdia of American Biography, II:470. In this pamphlet Fitch defends Nathaniel W. Taylor, who was his colleague at Yale. Regarding the authorship of this pamphlet, 1 OCLC entry (7 libraries) attributes it to Eleazar T. Fitch. 2 other OCLC entries (25 libraries) attribute it to N.W. Taylor himself based on Sidney Earl Mead: Nathaniel William Taylor, 1786-1858, Chicago, 1942, p.248 and also Franklin B. Dexter's Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College, New Haven, 1912, 6:161. However, the pamphlet refers to "Dr. Taylor" in the third person, whereas other pamphlets of Taylor in this controversy use the first person. I think it likely that Fitch was the author and not Taylor. American Imprints #30-1386 also lists it under Fitch. "The Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Permission of Sin, are attributed to Luther Hart, editor of the Quarterly Christian Spectator, and they are in response to Joseph Bellamy's The Wisdom of God in the Permission of Sin, as published in Bellamy's Works, v. 2, 1811"--OCLC. The pamphlet itself states in a footnote on the first page of the Review of Dr. Woods' Letters, "These remarks were originally subjoined to a review of Dr. Bellamy's Treatise on the permission of sin, which was passing through the press, at the time when Dr. Woods' Letter to Dr. Taylor were received. As the subject of these Letters is more immediately interesting to the public at the present time, we have here placed our remarks upon them first, and have subjoined the review of Dr. Bellamy, because it is frequently alluded to in our examination of Dr. Woods' Letters."--p.3. Pamphlet, side-stitched with printed tan wrapper, along spine strip wrapper is tattered and about half worn away, bottom & fore-edges untrimmed, light to medium foxing. Collation: 1-64, 71. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-39 Review of Dr. Woods' Letters, [40]-50 Remarks on Dr. Bellamy's Treatise, on the Permission of Sin." (17721) 
Price: 60.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
An Examination of a Review of Dr. Taylor's Sermon on Human Depravity, and Mr. Harvey's Strictures on that Sermon, HARVEY, JOSEPH
5 HARVEY, JOSEPH An Examination of a Review of Dr. Taylor's Sermon on Human Depravity, and Mr. Harvey's Strictures on that Sermon
1829 Good Pamphlet Octavo Hartford, CT 
Harvey's Examination of a Review of Dr. Taylor's Sermon on Human Depravity, Hartford, 1829

[HARVEY, JOSEPH]. An Examination of a Review of Dr. Taylor's Sermon on Human Depravity, and Mr. Harvey's Strictures on that Sermon. Hartford: Printed by Goodwin & Co., 1829. Octavo. $45.00

Joseph Harvey (1787-1873) Congregational minister. This pamphlet is attributed to Harvey in Franklin B. Dexter's Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College... 1912, v.6, p.201. Dexter also states that the review of Dr. Taylor's sermon, first published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator for June 1829 and later in a pamphlet, was written jointly by Chauncey A. Goodrich and Noah Porter. The reviewers Goodrich & Porter, based there review on Harvey's previously published "Strictures." So in this anonymously published examination of the Review, Harvey is in large measure defending & clarifying his own words. The controversy was about N.W. Taylor's theory of sin, moral agency & divine government. He summarizes his objections to Taylor's theology: "The peculiar feature, and what many will consider, the radical error of this theory, is the assumption, that all moral depravity consists in a free preference of the world to God. That such a preference is a consequence and an evidence of depravity, none will deny. But to say, that this preference is the root and source of the evil, is placing the subject on new ground, and seriously affecting all the great doctrines of the Gospel, which stand related to human depravity."--p.44.

Disbound pamphlet side-stitched with new linen thread, light foxing. Collation: 1-74. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-53pp, (3)pp blank.
(17293) 
Price: 45.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Letters on the Present State and Probable Results of Theological Speculations in Connecticut, HARVEY, JOSEPH.
6 HARVEY, JOSEPH. Letters on the Present State and Probable Results of Theological Speculations in Connecticut
1832 Good Pamphlet Octavo, 12.8 x 21.3cm Hartford, CT 
Joseph Harvey writing Against Nathaniel W. Taylor, 1832

HARVEY, JOSEPH. Letters on the Present State and Probable Results of Theological Speculations in Connecticut. By an Edwardean. [No place, no publisher; Hartford?] 1832. Octavo, 12.8 x 21.3cm.$45.00

Joseph Harvey (1787-1873) Congregational minister. In this pamphlet Harvey responds to either real or literary questions of a friend concerning the theological opinions of Nathaniel W. Taylor. Harvey stated that "Dr. Taylor's creed exhibits some of the peculiarities of Pelagianism: (e.g.) Peleagius denied original sin, or native depravity. So does Taylor."--p.25. Harvey also argues that the Theological Seminary had known years of harmony and revivals of religion. However, "this harmony and prosperity continued to increase until Dr. Taylor came into the field. And since that time the seeds of alienation and division have been industriously sown, and have produced a rapid growth and an early harvest."--p.27.

Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched, light to medium foxing. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-44pp. American Imprints 32-13392, with 44pp and only MWA. #32-12841 with 40pp.
(17734) 
Price: 45.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
7 LORD, NATHAN. Letter to the Rev. Daniel Dana, D.D., on Professor Park's Theology
1852 Pamphlet BOSTON, CROCKER & BREWSTER 
LORD, NATHAN. An Letter to the Rev. Daniel Dana, D.D., on Professor Park's Theology of New England. By Nathan Lord, President of Dartmouth College. Boston: Published by Crocker and Brewster, 47, Washington-street. 1852. Octavo.

Disbound pamphlet side-stitched with new linen thread, light foxing, small tear in edge of title, several dog-ears, the number "5" written in old pen at the top of the title. Collation: 1-74. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-54pp. (2) blank pp.

Nathan Lord (1792-1870) Congregational clergyman and president of Dartmouth College. He was pastor of the Congregational Church in Amherst, NH for 12 years before taking the position of president of Dartmouth College in 1828(upon the resignation of Bennet Tyler). He held this position until 1863. "He was an able executive and disciplinarian, however, and like his contemporary Mark Hopkins at Williams, a great teacher, whose character exercised a deep influence on students and associates. For many years he conducted courses in theology and ethics."--Dict. Amer. Biog. XI:409. "Dr. Lord upheld the institution of slavery, and thus incurred the censure of most northern people; but while he advocated his views in letters and sermons, Dartmouth was the only college in the United States for many years where colored students were admitted, and while under his care they were treated with uniform kindness and courtesy. He inclined to the old-school system of theology, and to a literal interpretation of the prophesies."--Appletons' Cyclopadia of American Biography, IV:25. "As a theologian he was, like Edwards, Hopkins, and Bellamy, of the school advocating a strictly liberal interpretation of prophecy, but left us few remains in print."--McClintock & Strong: Cyl. Biblical, Theol., & Eccl. Lit. V:505. In this work Lord sides with Daniel Dana in upholding the traditional Edwardian theology.
(17294) 
Price: 45.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
A Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration, SPRING, GARDINER.
8 SPRING, GARDINER. A Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration
1827 1st Edition Good Pamphlet Octavo, 12.8x20.2cm New York 
Gardiner Spring's Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration, 1st Edition, NY, 1827

SPRING, GARDINER. A Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration. By Gardiner Spring, Pastor of the Brick Presbyterian Church in the City of New-York. New-York. Published by John P. Haven, American Tract Society House, 142 Nassau-Street. 1827. (Printed by Vanderpool & Cole, 104 Beekman-street.) Octavo, 12.8 x 20.2cm. $40.00

Gardiner Spring (1785-1873) Presbyterian pastor, "He believed firmly in the revival method, which then dominated the American churches... He was a thorough Calvinist, with considerable liberality of spirit. He protested strongly against the exclusion of several synods from the Presbyterian Church in 1837 because of theological differences, but when the church divided he and his congregation joined the conservative branch."--Dict. Amer. Biog. XVII:480. We offer the 1st ed. (there was a 2nd in 1828) of Gardiner Spring's Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration. The pamphlet set off a string of replies and counter replies starting with Nathaniel W. Taylor's review in Essays on the Means of Regeneration, and Winslow Hubbard (under the pseud. Evangelus Pacificus) in Evangelical View of the Nature and Means of Regeneration. Bennet Tyler replied with Strictures on the Review of Dr. Spring's Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration. Taylor replied then replied with Review of Dr. Tyler's Strictures upon a Article in the Christian Spectator. Tyler then replied with A Vindication of the Strictures on the Review of Dr. Spring's Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration, in the Christian Spectator for 1829, in Reply to the Reviewer and Evangelus Pacificus.

Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched, medium foxing, multiple holes where the pamphlet had been stitched into a bound volume, tear in bottom of one leaf repaired with archival paper. Pagination: (1) title, (1) copyright & printer, [3]-50, (4) blank. American Imprints #27-30693.
(17729) 
Price: 40.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
A Further Reply to Dr. Tyler, on the Doctrines of Propagated Depravity, &c., TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
9 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Further Reply to Dr. Tyler, on the Doctrines of Propagated Depravity, &c.
1833 Good Pamphlet Octavo, 15.2 x 24.5cm Boston 
Taylor's Further Reply to Dr. Tyler on the Doctrines of Propagated Depravity, &c., Boston, 1833

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Further Reply to Dr. Tyler, on the Doctrines of Propagated Depravity, &c. By N.W. Taylor. [Boston, 1833] Octavo, 15.2 x 24.5cm. $75.00

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) theologian and educator. Taylor entered Yale in 1800, later studied under Timothy Dwight and was ordained minister of the First Church of Christ, New Haven, 1812. In 1822 upon the formation of the Yale Divinity School, he became Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology, a position he held to within a few weeks of his death. "In order to guard against the idea that man is saved by any merit of his own, Calvinism seemed to exclude any real freedom of choice. Edwards in his treatise on the will in grappling with this difficulty had declared that man has a natural ability to repent but is inhibited by his moral disinclinations; his only freedom is liberty to obey the strongest motive... [Taylor] Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order...he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of the freedom of choice. He denied that our consciousness of freedom is an illusion and asserted that the will is not another name for the strongest motive, but is a power to chose between motives. Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.' To induce men to turn from their evil ways and choose the highest good, appeal must be made to man's natural desire for happiness, which Taylor unfortunately called 'self love.' This self-love will finally become, in a regenerated mind, identical with an unselfish love for God. Such an interpretation of the freedom of the will and the modifications of Calvinism attendant upon it aroused a storm of controversy and divided the churches of New England into 'Taylorites and Tylerites' the adherents of Taylor and of his principal opponent, Bennet Tyler. The debate , passing beyond the borders of New England, became the chief theological reason for the disruption of the Presbyterian Church in 1838."--Charles A. Dinsmore in Dictionary of American Biography, XVIII:338-339. Taylor's "idea of the certainty but not the necessity of man's sin was not outside orthodoxy, and was essential, because his audience no longer knew the Reformation theology, and did not accept the idea of man's 'total depravity.' Taylor exerted a strong influence upon the revivalists, especially Charles G. Finney, whose theological system at Oberlin College, Ohio, 'bore clear marks of Taylorism.'"--Nelson R. Burr: Critical Bibliography of Religion in American, II:994-995. This pamphlet continues the controversy on depravity & regeneration. Taylor had replied to Tyler in his Remarks on propagated depravity and sin as the necessary means of the greatest good, New Haven, 1832. In this pamphlet he continues his thoughts on the doctrines of propagated depravity: "The next subject on which Dr. Tyler questions the consistency and orthodoxy of my views, is the doctrine of Depravity by nature."
Pamphlet in original printed self-title wrapper, lacking rear wrap, fore-edge & bottom edge untrimmed, untrimmed page edges tattered a bit, light foxing. Pagination: [title printed on wrapper, pagination starts with first page of text] [27]-60pp. American Imprints #33-21445. OCLC locates only 2 libraries: Columbia Univ. Libr. & Yale Univ. Libr.
(17732) 
Price: 75.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler.  First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833., TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
10 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler. First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833.
1833 Pamphlet, side-stitched Good Pamphlet Octavo, 15.2 x 24.2cm New Haven 
Nathaniel W. Taylor vs. Dr. Tyler on Native Depravity & Regeneration, New Haven, 1833

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. A Letter from Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, on the Subject of His Late Discussion with Rev. Dr. Tyler. First published in the Quarterly Christian Spectator. For September, 1833. New=Haven: Published by Stephen Cooke. Printed by Baldwin & Ellis. [1833] Octavo, 15.2 x 24.2cm. $50.00

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) theologian and educator. Taylor entered Yale in 1800, later studied under Timothy Dwight and was ordained minister of the First Church of Christ, New Haven, 1812. In 1822 upon the formation of the Yale Divinity School, he became Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology, a position he held to within a few weeks of his death. "In order to guard against the idea that man is saved by any merit of his own, Calvinism seemed to exclude any real freedom of choice. Edwards in his treatise on the will in grappling with this difficulty had declared that man has a natural ability to repent but is inhibited by his moral disinclinations; his only freedom is liberty to obey the strongest motive... [Taylor] Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order...he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of the freedom of choice. He denied that our consciousness of freedom is an illusion and asserted that the will is not another name for the strongest motive, but is a power to chose between motives. Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.' To induce men to turn from their evil ways and choose the highest good, appeal must be made to man's natural desire for happiness, which Taylor unfortunately called 'self love.' This self-love will finally become, in a regenerated mind, identical with an unselfish love for God. Such an interpretation of the freedom of the will and the modifications of Calvinism attendant upon it aroused a storm of controversy and divided the churches of New England into 'Taylorites and Tylerites' the adherents of Taylor and of his principal opponent, Bennet Tyler. The debate , passing beyond the borders of New England, became the chief theological reason for the disruption of the Presbyterian Church in 1838."--Charles A. Dinsmore in Dictionary of American Biography, XVIII:338-339. Taylor's "idea of the certainty but not the necessity of man's sin was not outside orthodoxy, and was essential, because his audience no longer knew the Reformation theology, and did not accept the idea of man's 'total depravity.' Taylor exerted a strong influence upon the revivalists, especially Charles G. Finney, whose theological system at Oberlin College, Ohio, 'bore clear marks of Taylorism.'"--Nelson R. Burr: Critical Bibliography of Religion in American, II:994-995. Henry Martyn Dexter: "Collection toward a Bibliography of Congregationalism" #5292. This pamphlet is in reply & reference to Dexter #5193 & #5226, Bennet Tyler's Remarks on Rev. Dr. Taylor's Letter to Dr. Hawes, and Correspondence between Rev. N.W. Taylor, D.D. and Rev. J. Hawes, D.D. The controversy turned around native depravity and regeneration.

Pamphlet, side-stitched, fore-edge and bottom edge not trimmed, untrimmed page edges tattered a bit, title page soiled and worn almost through in several spots, small damp stains in outer margins, light to medium foxing. American Imprints #33-21446.
(17730) 
Price: 50.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology.  A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus, TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
11 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus
1829 Good Pamphlet Octavo New Haven, CT 
Nathaniel W. Taylor's An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. New Haven, 1829

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sin, as Exhibited in Dr. Dwight's Theology. A Letter to a Friend, by Clericus. New Haven: Printed by Hezekiah Howe. 1829. Octavo.

Pamphlet, disbound and side-stitched, very light foxing. The number "3." written at top of title. Collation: 1-54, 62. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-21 Letter &c, [22]-43 Postscript, (1) blank. The Postscript discusses Mr. Harvey's Review of N.W. Taylor's sermon, Concio ad clerum. Amer. Imprints #38198.

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) Congregational theologian and educator. In 1822 he was appointed Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology in Yale Divinity School. "Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order... he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of freedom of choice... Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.'"--Dict. Amer. Biog., XVIII:338.
(17056) 
Price: 65.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination, TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W.
12 TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination
1832 Pamphlet in original printed paper wrapper with t Good Octavo, 15.8 x 24.8cm. Boston 
N.W. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler in the Hawes/Taylor/Tyler Controversy re Native Depravity & Regeneration, Boston, 1832

TAYLOR, NATHANIEL W. Dr. Taylor's Reply to Dr. Tyler's Examination. Boston: Printed by Peirce and Parker, No. 9, Cornhill. 1832. Octavo, 15.8 x 24.8cm. $55.00

Nathaniel W. Taylor (1786-1858) theologian and educator. Taylor entered Yale in 1800, later studied under Timothy Dwight and was ordained minister of the First Church of Christ, New Haven, 1812. In 1822 upon the formation of the Yale Divinity School, he became Dwight Professor of Didactic Theology, a position he held to within a few weeks of his death. "In order to guard against the idea that man is saved by any merit of his own, Calvinism seemed to exclude any real freedom of choice. Edwards in his treatise on the will in grappling with this difficulty had declared that man has a natural ability to repent but is inhibited by his moral disinclinations; his only freedom is liberty to obey the strongest motive... [Taylor] Being of a bold and original mind, endowed with speculative talents of a high order...he broke through the narrow confines of the accepted theology. Moreover, he was a revival preacher deeply concerned with relating religious truth to the facts of human consciousness. His point of divergence was the reality of the freedom of choice. He denied that our consciousness of freedom is an illusion and asserted that the will is not another name for the strongest motive, but is a power to chose between motives. Man, he affirmed, is not born totally depraved, but with certain sinful inclinations, and his 'sin consists in sinning.' To induce men to turn from their evil ways and choose the highest good, appeal must be made to man's natural desire for happiness, which Taylor unfortunately called 'self love.' This self-love will finally become, in a regenerated mind, identical with an unselfish love for God. Such an interpretation of the freedom of the will and the modifications of Calvinism attendant upon it aroused a storm of controversy and divided the churches of New England into 'Taylorites and Tylerites' the adherents of Taylor and of his principal opponent, Bennet Tyler. The debate , passing beyond the borders of New England, became the chief theological reason for the disruption of the Presbyterian Church in 1838."--Charles A. Dinsmore in Dictionary of American Biography, XVIII:338-339. Taylor's "idea of the certainty but not the necessity of man's sin was not outside orthodoxy, and was essential, because his audience no longer knew the Reformation theology, and did not accept the idea of man's 'total depravity.' Taylor exerted a strong influence upon the revivalists, especially Charles G. Finney, whose theological system at Oberlin College, Ohio, 'bore clear marks of Taylorism.'"--Nelson R. Burr: Critical Bibliography of Religion in American, II:994-995. Henry Martyn Dexter: "Collections Toward a Bibliography of Congregationalism" #5227. This controversy, centered around sin/native depravity/regeneration, was started when Taylor reviewed Joel Hawes paper, then Tyler replied to Taylor's review, to which Taylor replies with our pamphlet. Taylor is defending the "orthodoxy" of his positions.

Pamphlet in original printed paper wrapper with title printed on front wrap, side stitched, fore-edge & bottom edge not trimmed, untrimmed page edges tattered a bit, wrapper soiled a bit, large damp stain in upper right hand corner of pages, light foxing. Pagination: [title printed on wrapper, pagination starts with first page of text] [1]-24pp. Small errata slip pasted to bottom of p.24. American Imprints#32-14935.
(17731) 
Price: 55.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
A Letter to the Editor of the Spirit of the Pilgrims.  To which are Added Remarks on a Recent Letter of Dr. Taylor in the Christian Spectator, TYLER, BENNET
13 TYLER, BENNET A Letter to the Editor of the Spirit of the Pilgrims. To which are Added Remarks on a Recent Letter of Dr. Taylor in the Christian Spectator
1833 Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched Good Pamphlet Octavo Portland, Maine 
New England Theology, Bennet Tyler's reply to Nathaniel W. Taylor, Portland, Maine, 1833

TYLER, BENNET. A Letter to the Editor of the Spirit of the Pilgrims. To which are Added Remarks on a Recent Letter of Dr. Taylor in the Christian Spectator. By Bennet Tyler, D.D. Pastor of the Second Congregational Church in Portland, Me. Portland: Printed by Merrill and Byram. 1833. Octavo. $50.00

Bennet Tyler (1783-1858) American Congregational pastor, theologian, educator. President of Dartmouth College for 6 years, first President and professor of Christian theology of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, leader of the `Old School' Calvinists. "In this same year [1828] a sermon preached by Dr. Nathaniel W. Taylor at the Yale Commencement let loose a flood of theological controversy among the New England churches, especially in Connecticut, between the 'Old School' Calvinists and the 'New Divinity' as promulgated from New Haven. Being an ardent conservative and one of the ablest interpreters of the old theology, Tyler was drawn into the debate and became a recognized leader of conservative orthodoxy. On Sept. 10, 1833, forty ministers met in East Windsor, Conn., and resolved to establish a theological seminary--if twenty thousand dollars could be raised--to counteract, as far as possible, the harmful effects of the 'New Divinity as taught in New Haven. The money was raised in a few weeks, the corner-stone of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, now the Hartford Theological Seminary, was laid May 13, 1834, and Tyler was inducted into office as president and professor of Christian theology on the same day. This position he held for twenty-three years, resigning on account of the infirmities of age July 16, 1857... Not an original or speculative thinker, Tyler dwelt contentedly in the Calvinistic system as modified by Jonathan Edwards and tempered by Timothy Dwight"--Dict. Amer. Biog. XIX:85. In this pamphlet Tyler continues the now 5 year controversy with Nathaniel W. Taylor, re Taylor misrepresentations of Tyler's theological positions relative to sin and other doctrines.

Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched, mostly light foxing but with title and last page much heavier foxing. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [3]-40pp. Amer. Imprints #21589.
(17158) 
Price: 50.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Remarks on Rev. Dr. Taylor's Letter to Dr. Hawes., TYLER, BENNET
14 TYLER, BENNET Remarks on Rev. Dr. Taylor's Letter to Dr. Hawes.
Bennet Tyler's Objections of Dr. Taylor's Letter to Dr. Hawes, Boston, 1832 Pamphlet bound in original printed wrapper, side-s wrapper soiled, fore-edge & bottom edge not trimmed and a bit tattered, large damp stain in upper outer corner of all pages, light to medium foxing. pamphlet . Octavo, 15.5 x 24.6cm Boston: Printed by Peirce & Parker, No. 9 Cornhill. 
TYLER, BENNET. Remarks on Rev. Dr. Taylor's Letter to Dr. Hawes. By Bennet Tyler, D.D. Boston: Printed by Peirce & Parker, No. 9 Cornhill. 1832. Octavo, 15.5 x 24.6cm. $55.00 Bennet Tyler (1783-1858) American Congregational pastor, theologian, educator. President of Dartmouth College for 6 years, first President and professor of Christian theology of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, leader of the `Old School' Calvinists. "In this same year [1828] a sermon preached by Dr. Nathaniel W. Taylor at the Yale Commencement let loose a flood of theological controversy among the New England churches, especially in Connecticut, between the 'Old School' Calvinists and the 'New Divinity' as promulgated from New Haven. Being an ardent conservative and one of the ablest interpreters of the old theology, Tyler was drawn into the debate and became a recognized leader of conservative orthodoxy. On Sept. 10, 1833, forty ministers met in East Windsor, Conn., and resolved to establish a theological seminary--if twenty thousand dollars could be raised--to counteract, as far as possible, the harmful effects of the 'New Divinity as taught in New Haven. The money was raised in a few weeks, the corner-stone of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, now the Hartford Theological Seminary, was laid May 13, 1834, and Tyler was inducted into office as president and professor of Christian theology on the same day. This position he held for twenty-three years, resigning on account of the infirmities of age July 16, 1857... Not an original or speculative thinker, Tyler dwelt contentedly in the Calvinistic system as modified by Jonathan Edwards and tempered by Timothy Dwight"--Dict. Amer. Biog. XIX:85. Tyler begins this pamphlet with "that his [Taylor's] theories do involve principles subversive of some of the most prominent and important articles of his creed, I shall endeavor to show in the following remarks." [p.3] He then proceeds under 4 points: "I. The Doctrine of Decrees. II. The Doctrine of Original Sin. III. The Doctrine of Regeneration. IV. The Doctrine of Election." Tyler closes the pamphlet with: The reader will perceive that each of the topics brought into view in the preceding remarks, might be made the subject of extended discussion; but my object has been to present a brief general view of what I conceive to be the tendency of Dr. Taylor's speculations. I have felt it the most important to do this, on account of the attempts which have been made to convince the public that the points on which Dr. Taylor differs from his brethren are of trifling consequence; as the relate chiefly not to doctrines, but to philosophy, of religion. But if his philosophical theories, as I have attempted to show, do tend to sap the foundations of some of the fundamental doctrines of the Gospel, they are not to be regarded as harmless; nor ought the Christian community to slumber, while such strenuous efforts are making to give them currency in the world." [p.12]

Pamphlet bound in original printed wrapper, side-stitched, wrapper soiled, fore-edge & bottom edge not trimmed and a bit tattered, large damp stain in upper outer corner of all pages, light to medium foxing. American Imprints #32-15066. OCLC locates 10 libraries. (17733) 
Price: 55.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Vindication of the Strictures on the Review of Dr. Spring's Disserta, TYLER, BENNET
15 TYLER, BENNET Vindication of the Strictures on the Review of Dr. Spring's Disserta
1830 Good Pamphlet Octavo Portland, Maine 
Bennet Tyler's Vindication of His Strictures on Nathanial W. Taylor's Review of Dr. Spring's Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration. Portland, Maine, 1830

TYLER, BENNET. A Vindication of the Strictures on the Review of Dr. Spring's Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration, in the Christian Spectator for 1829, in Reply to the Reviewer and Evangelus Pacificus. By Bennet Tyler, D.D. Pastor of the Second Congregational Church, Portland, Maine. Portland: Shirley and Hyde, Exchange-Street. 1830. Octavo. $35.00

Bennet Tyler (1783-1858) American Congregational pastor, theologian, educator. President of Dartmouth College for 6 years, first President and professor of Christian theology of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, leader of the `Old School' Calvinists. "In this same year [1828] a sermon preached by Dr. Nathaniel W. Taylor at the Yale Commencement let loose a flood of theological controversy among the New England churches, especially in Connecticut, between the 'Old School' Calvinists and the 'New Divinity' as promulgated from New Haven. Being an ardent conservative and one of the ablest interpreters of the old theology, Tyler was drawn into the debate and became a recognized leader of conservative orthodoxy. On Sept. 10, 1833, forty ministers met in East Windsor, Conn., and resolved to establish a theological seminary--if twenty thousand dollars could be raised--to counteract, as far as possible, the harmful effects of the 'New Divinity' as taught in New Haven. The money was raised in a few weeks, the corner-stone of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, now the Hartford Theological Seminary, was laid May 13, 1834, and Tyler was inducted into office as president and professor of Christian theology on the same day. This position he held for twenty-three years, resigning on account of the infirmities of age July 16, 1857... Not an original or speculative thinker, Tyler dwelt contentedly in the Calvinistic system as modified by Jonathan Edwards and tempered by Timothy Dwight"--Dict. Amer. Biog. XIX:85.

Gardiner Spring wrote the original pamphlet, Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration. Nathanial W. Taylor reviewed Spring's work in Essays on the Means of Regeneration as did Winslow Hubbard (under the pseud. Evangelus Pacificus) in Evangelical View of the Nature and Means of Regeneration. Tyler then replied with Strictures on the Review of Dr. Spring's Dissertation on the Means of Regeneration. Nathanial W. Taylor replied with Review of Dr. Tyler's Strictures upon an Article in the Christian Spectator. Tyler then replied to Taylor with our pamphlet. "The objections which I have urged against the scheme of the Reviewer, are not to my mind satisfactorily obviated. It still appears to me to involve principles of dangerous tendency--principles tending to sap the foundation of the doctrines of grace:--although I do not believe that he will ever adopt as his own belief, the consequences to which his principles lead, yet I do seriously fear, that he is preparing the way for the gradual influx of error upon the American churches, disastrous to the interests of evangelical religion"--p.v.

Disbound pamphlet, newly side-stitched with linen thread, small 2cm hole in title page, top corner torn from pp.21-22, light to medium foxing, verso of final leaf tanning quite a bit. Collation: 1-84. Pagination: (1) title, (1) blank, [iii]-vi introduction, [7]-63, (1) blank. American Imprints 30-3788.
(17209) 
Price: 35.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
16 TYLER, BENNET. Doctrine of the Saints' Perseverance, Further Vindicated: in Reply
1818 Pamphlet Octavo New Haven, CT 
Bennet Tyler on The Doctrine of the Saints Perseverance, New Haven, 1818

TYLER, BENNET. The Doctrine of the Saints' Perseverance, Further Vindicated: in Reply to the Animadversions of Mr. Rayner and Mr. Thorp, upon a Sermon of the Author on that Subject. To which is added An Appendix, in which the remarks of Mr. Rayner upon Calvinism in General, are Considered. By Bennet Tyler, Pastor of a Church in Southbury. To the law and to the testimony; if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them Isa. viii.20. New-Haven: T. G. Woodward, Printer. 1818. Octavo.

Disbound pamphlet, side-stitched, medium foxing throughout. Early owners signature partially trimmed away. Collation: A-F4, G2. Pagination: (1) title, (1) intro., [3]-51, (1) blank. American Bibliography #45913. Bennet Tyler (1783-1858) American Congregational pastor, theologian, educator. President of Dartmouth College for 6 years, first President and professor of Christian theology of the Theological Institute of Connecticut, leader of the `Old School' Calvinists. "Being an ardent conservative and one of the ablest interpreters of the old theology, Tyler was drawn into the debate and became a recognized leader of conservatively orthodox... Not an original or speculative thinker, Tyler dwelt contentedly in the Calvinistic system as modified by Jonathan Edwards and tempered by Timothy Dwight"--Dict. Amer. Biog. XIX:85. Tyler had published a pamphlet the previous year on "The Doctrine of the Saints' Perseverance." In the present work, "Further Vindicated," Tyler responds to the replies of "Mr. Rayner and Mr. Thorp." "The sermon which has given occasion to the animadversions of Mr. Rayner and Mr. Thorp, was preached and published without any design or expectation of provoking a controversy. The object of it was to vindicate and establish what the writer deemed important truth. It has been judged, however, to contain errors, dangerous to the souls of men, and deserving public animadversion. Whether the pamphlets reviewed in the following sheets, merited any public notice, has been a very serious question with the writer. So far as his own feelings are concerned, he should have chosen to remain silent, but considering that we are required 'to contend earnestly for the faith, once delivered to the saints,' and that a further discussion of the doctrine in question, may possibly assist the enquirer after truth, he has 'judged it expedient to reply.'"--intro.
(16146) 
Price: 65.00 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to raretheology@stroudbooks.com
Copyright©2017. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie