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MANUSCRIPTS-AMERICAN

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MANUSCRIPTS:MANUSCRIPTS-AMERICAN

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1 ANONYMOUS. MSS History of the 1st Baptist Church of Pella, Marin County, Iowa

ANONYMOUS. MSS History of the 1st Baptist Church of Pella, Marin County, Iowa. The Church was organized in 1844. 20.4 x 25.4cm. 7 sheets written in old pen on both sides making 13 numbered pages plus a blank page, 2 holes punched with thin thread through holes holding pages together. Some cross-outs in the text, but quite readable. The first leaves are a sermon on Numbers 23:23, re Balak & Balaam. The author then proceed in the final 7 pages with the History of the Aurora Baptist Church. "Some 29 years ago a Bapt. Ch. was organized in the Hamilton Neighborhood--6 miles S.E. of this city [i.e. 1844]. Records of this Ch. lost by fire. Worshiped in private-houses or school houses for 10 years. One of its pillars Dea. Mossaman--1st pastor Rev. M. J. Post..." "The Ch. moved to Pella During this time [1854] it was enjoying the pastoral care of Rev. J. C. Curtis... known as the 1st Bapt. Ch. of Pella." Describes growth in Pella from 25 to 223. However by 1863 the church had weakened and in September of that year "the organization disbanded." However, at the same time, a new baptist church was organized as the Pella Baptist Church and with 16 members, growing to 246 members in 1873. 
Price: 95.00 USD
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The Book of the Times or a History of the War.  Understandest thou what thou readest? Philip.  How can I except some men should guide me?  Eunuch.  A e i o u l m n r., ANONYMOUS.
2 ANONYMOUS. The Book of the Times or a History of the War. Understandest thou what thou readest? Philip. How can I except some men should guide me? Eunuch. A e i o u l m n r.
Manuscript--A Clever roman à clé in the Style of the O.T. re a Church in Philadelphia, circa 1810 [Methodist? Episcopal?] 1810 Paper covered boards Good Manuscript book 16.8 x 19.9cm. Philadelphia, Pa. 
ANONYMOUS. The Book of the Times or a History of the War. Understandest thou what thou readest? Philip. How can I except some men should guide me? Eunuch. A e i o u l m n r. Manuscript, one volume, 44 pages [Philadelphia area, circa 1810?] 16.8 x 19.9cm. $400.00 This is an exceedingly clever roman à clé done in the style of the Old Testament scripture. Divided into three "books" of multiple chapters, it documents the turbulent differences within a religious community, apparently in Philadelphia or the area. The volume contains first names only. When person of the same name are mentioned, the anonymous author might write "William surnamed P," "William surnamed N," and "Henry F." on occasion. The text commences with the difficulties of Henry, an elder who opposed the church leadership's plans to renovate their sanctuary and in the process sell commercial space on the cellar floors. Led by Samuel, the meeting clerk (or "Scribe" as the writer has it, Henry was forced out after being accused of adultery. To prove the accusation of his critics "bort forth an Harlot, who testified that Henry was the Father of one of her two Children." This escalates rather than calms the situation. Further disputes arise, power struggles flare, personalities clash, and a minute-book with key document is mysteriously mutilated. All seems to culminate in arguments over control of the church's "Chartered Fund," that is to say its endowment. There are references to ministering to prisoners and Africans and also to "a new sect who call themselves The Society of Hospitality." A delightful and cleverly-done manuscript. The manuscript is bound thick card cover with Pennsylvania-Dutch style tulip decorated paper on the outside. Written over the decorated paper on the back cover & upside down is "Philadelphia Pennsylvania William Book." The spine is covered with a blue piece of printed paper that reads "Controller's Copy Book. No. 3. Published by J.B. Smith & Co., Booksellers and Stationers, No. 207 Market St., above 5th, Phila." Blue paper chipped and split along lower half of spine, tulip paper rubbed through the decoration in places, contents with moderate to heavy foxing--a dark stain in top inside of most pages, several pages loose or almost loose but not lacking any pages. Written in a very legible longhand. 12cm tear in last leaf but no loss of text. 
Price: 400.00 USD
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3 BOARDMAN MSS LETTER, undated, from S. L. Boardman of South Norridgewock, ME, ad

BOARDMAN, SAMUEL LANE. MSS LETTER, undated, from S. L. Boardman of South Norridgewock, ME, addressed to the editor of the "Eastern Star: Concerns the "ravages" of the cankerworm to the elm & apple trees of Kennebunk and York, ME. Letter is 3+ pp, not signed, & appears to be unfinished. Boardman(1836-1914) agricultural journalist with the Country Gentleman & the Main Farmer (editor for 16 years). Elected Secretary of the Maine State Bd. of Agriculture in 1873. 
Price: 17.50 USD
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A love letter with plans for property and marriage and a trip to Ohio, Cecil
4 Cecil A love letter with plans for property and marriage and a trip to Ohio
1916 Manuscript letter 
Manuscript love letter re plans for property in Ohio & marriage, WV[?] Feb 8, 1916

A love letter with plans for property and marriage and a trip to Ohio. Three sheets of linen style paper 16.3 x 26.2cm folded 2 ways. In gray neat hand. Some light foxing. Dated Feb. 8, 1916. $45.00

The letter starts with "Hellow Monchere Feb. 8,-1916. My Dear Dear Lover:" It commences with a lengthy apology for not writing sooner then recounts a trip the author took to Ohio to visit friends to look and try to purchase a farm. "You know I have had a little trip out in Ohio of late and was among friends and in the level country for just a week.... Then E.E. and I left Ron. [Ronceverte?] on No. 5. And arrived at Rushylvania Ohio at 5 o'clock Fri. evening, went out to my Friends Mr. McCulloch's and spent the night. Then Sat. morning John McC., Earl and I went out to the farm there which joins to theirs, and took a good look over all of it, and the buildings as well, everything about the place looked very well and very well it had been cared for.... I started home Thursday morning and after having a good chance to look over a part of Columbus left there at 4-20 and arrived home next morning on No. 4. had quite a long wait in Huntington at night for 4, which was late... altho there wasn't a bit of snow there, when I left, but plenty here when I got home. Most every one out there that knew me wanted to know what time this spring I was going to get married and come there to live.... Now You are anxious to know of course if Earl and I made a deal. We have not closed it yet but I am almost shure we will because his is anxious to get out there providing the better half will get the same notion soon.... You know Honey I sometimes think I am missing the happiest part of this life by going on as I have and never having a home of my own with the one I love... And I will say just now that is one of the reasons why I considered a proposition of my brothers, And if we close this deal, which I expect we will soon, it will make a great deal of difference with me about the future, in regard to asking You to become my wife..." In the last paragraph he discusses visiting her again soon with her permission but "as the roads and traveling is now, it makes a trip that far quite a task, And I don't know how would be the easiest way of going. Any way I am coming to see You some time soon if You will permit me to do so. I will look for Your letter some time soon. And will close with all love and greetings to You My Dear. A sweet good by with love, Cecil."
(17784) 
Price: 45.00 USD
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Manuscript Diary of George W. Finley, Romney, WV, covering years 1884-1885., FINLEY, GEORGE W.
5 FINLEY, GEORGE W. Manuscript Diary of George W. Finley, Romney, WV, covering years 1884-1885.
Diary 1884-85, of George W. Finley--Went over the Wall beside Armistead at Gettysburg, then as POW, one of the 'Immortal 600;" Presbyterian minister in Romney, WV 1884-85 Leather The journal is bound in black morocco leather with a fold-around flap to protect pages when carried in a pocket. Small gilt oval on flap that reads "Standard Diary No. 159. Small metal piece on back cover that reads "Patented June 29, 73." Leather at bottom of spine and bottom of edges is starting to fray or tatter, leather split along bottom 5cm of rear hinge, rubbed at all edges, pencil notes on endpapers, pages are lightly tanned but in good condition. 6 x 15.5cm. Romney, WV 
FINLEY, GEORGE W. Manuscript Diary of George W. Finley, Romney, WV, covering years 1884-1885. 6 x 15.5cm.

George Williamson Finley (1838-1909) First Lieutenant, 56th Virginia Infantry, one of the few men who crossed the stone wall beside Gen Lewis Armistead at Gettysburg during Pickett's charge. Finley was beside Armistead as the general lost consciousness on the battlefield. He was taken prisoner, spending the next two years in Unions prisons including at Hilton Head were he became one of the Confederate "Immortal 600." Finley was born Dec. 1, 1838 in Yanceyville, NC. but was raised in Clarksville, VA. He entered Hampden-Sydney College but graduated from Washington College (now Washington & Lee) in 1856. Finley enrolled as a captain in the Confederate Army on May 12, 1861. While he was a prisoner, he decided to become a minister and entered Union Theological Seminary in 1866. He served as pastor in Romney, WV from 1870-1892; then was appointed evangelist for the Abingdon, Virginia Presbytery; and then pastor of the Tinkling Springs Presbyterian Church, Fishersville, VA 1903-1909.

The journal consists of lined pages with one page for every day of the year. Finley used the same journal for both 1884 and 1885. The same date as 1884 has the correct day of the week penned in along with "85" at the head of the entry. Pagination of the journal: (32) printed pages including color title & typical almanac material, (366) lined pages for each day, (3) lined memoranda pages, (39) ledger accounting pages. The contents are brief summary of what he did most days, from riding to a parishoner's house to baptize their infant or perform a marriage to "Bred our cow to Bob Fisher's ½ Jersey" or "went fishing quite successful," and "At home--in garden Planted potatoes." It references a revival/special meetings in his church in Jan/Feb. of 1884: "All agree that this meeting must go on prayer meeting to preaching. For several nights I have invited after preaching, all who desired God's blessing in themselves or others to come into the Lecture room. Almost the whole congregation comes--a Solemn Service." Feb. 3 "Closed meeting a very solemn service. Praise to God for His wonderful mercy--Oh to be more faithful. In one way or another about 30 persons express some interest in Salvation, 10 or 12 indulge hope. On May 4, 1884 he mentions his 25th wedding anniversary: "Cumberland, Md.... This is the 25th Anniversary of My Marriage. How great the Lord has been to spare my dear wife to me so long." He and his wife had 14 children of which 9 survived his death. He mentions them Sept 4, 1885 "John & Willie started to Mossy Creek, Jno. to teach & Willie to go to school. God bless the dear boys..." Ledger pages at the end are filled in with financial records for his church.

Entries also include references to his past in the Confederate army: May 29, 1885 "Moorefield before 3pm Address to Ladies Memorial Association to aid them in purchasing Headstone for the Confederate Dead buried in the Cemetery at M." or Aug. 13 1884 "Reunion of Ex. Confederates at Pancakes Sulpher Spring. Large attendance--pleasant day..." June 6, 1885 "Came home to attend the Exercises of Memorial Day. The largest crowd I ever saw in Romney... 12 or 1500 people..."

He traveled a good bit on the newly built railroads in his area: Aug. 20, 1884 "Started with Willie for Thomas on W.Va. Central & Pittsburgh R.R...." Aug. 22, 1884 "Walked with Willie over to the mouth of Beaver Creek on Blackwater--the proposed site of Davis the present terminus W.Va.C. & P. R.R. Boarded at Robt. Eastham's the only home except a few laborer's huts. Aug 24, 1884 "At Easthams to preach forbidden by the Dr. because my throat. How I long to quicken those RailRoad hands & preach to them. No Sabbath for these poor people in the wilderness." Then on Sept 1, 1884 "Cora, Jno. & Lul Eggleston left 1st train over So. Branch Railway..." On that date the South Branch Railroad Company complete its first section from its connection with the B&O RR at Green Spring, WV to Romney WV. Finley also made many trips to Richmond Va. where he was on the Board of Trustees of Hampden-Sidney College "H.S. College."

Sold with the journal: Finley's 1889 pass for travel on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, boldy signed by him on the verso, "Order for Clerical Ticket. This Order is good only when Officially Stamped for the purchase of tickets to and from Stations on Main Line and Branches East of the Ohio River." Good+ condition.

The journal is bound in black morocco leather with a fold-around flap to protect pages when carried in a pocket. Small gilt oval on flap that reads "Standard Diary No. 159. Small metal piece on back cover that reads "Patented June 29, 73." Leather at bottom of spine and bottom of edges is starting to fray or tatter, leather split along bottom 5cm of rear hinge, rubbed at all edges, pencil notes on endpapers, pages are lightly tanned but in good condition.
(17805) 
Price: 875.00 USD
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6 HODGE Typed, signed letter on the letterhead of The Board of Education of
19TH-AM-PA-PHILA 
HODGE, EDWARD B. Typed, signed letter on the letterhead of The Board of Education of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Dated Philadelphia, Mar. 15, 1899. 20.5 x 26.7cm. Letter addressed to Mr. J.L.M. Curry, Room 3, Kellogg Bldg., Washington, D.C. Signed: "Edward B. Hodge" Corres. Secty. "As you ask particularly as to the location of schools for the colored race in the south, I would refer you for detailed information to the Rev. E.P. Cowan, D.D., #516 Market Street, Pittsburgh, Penna., who is Corresponding Secretary of the Board for Freedmen... An important Presbyterian institution for the education of colored men is Lincoln University, situated near Oxford, Chester Co., Penna. It has a collegiate and theological department..." Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry (1825-1903) statesman, author, educator. Probably best known for his life long efforts for public education in the South. 
Price: 30.00 USD
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